Washington State University

Name of CPED-Influenced Program: State-wide Doctor of Education Program in Leadership in Education

 

Key Contact Person: 

 

For the EdD in Educational Leadership, lead contact is:

Gordon Gates
(509) 358-7749
gates@wsu.edu

For Teacher Leadership Strand:

Richard Sawyer
(360) 546 9658
rsawyer@vancouver.wsu.edu

Program Description: 

The Washington State University four-year Educational Leadership program prepares practitioner-scholars for leadership roles and challenges in education at the local, state, national, and international levels. The statewide Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) program is offered on all WSU campuses and fosters a community of leaders who work together to strengthen educational services and learning opportunities in schools, communities, colleges, and other educational organizations. A team of academic and field-experienced faculty blends scholarship and practical expertise to prepare classroom, building, district, and post-secondary leaders who utilize research, implement policy, and reform practice to improve learning and achievement for all students. Faculty from both departments in the College of Education participate in the statewide Ed.D. program.

 

Stage in Redesign Process:Experienced with Graduates
Signature Pedagogy: 

Program emphasizes 2 major strands to prepare “practitioner-scholars” for leadership roles in K-16 schools:  Ethics and social justice; leadership studies; systems analysis; and inquiry.  Core courses are structured into program to address these strands; strands are tested in preliminary exam.  Inquiry is emphasized throughout the program through research studies assigned in courses, inquiry training in summer institutes, including action research, and original research study for dissertation. Furthermore, as students are both K-16 teachers and administrators, students prepare to be collaborative systemwide problem solvers.

 

 

Laboratories of Practice: 

Action research training in summer institutes prepares and encourages students to conduct collaborative inquiry in their K-12 school settings to address problems of practice related to student learning. In the Teacher Leadership specialization a laboratory of practice is focused on the impact of clinical practice to K-16 students.

Capstone: 

Dissertation – original research study; traditional dissertation format; completed at end of program

Description of each year of the Program: 

Program structured to allow completion within 4 years; courses sequenced/accessible across all 4 campuses; 2 summer institutes required (6 credits each); total credits required – 72 (42 of graded coursework)

Flexible—Part-time students have choice as to how many courses to take each semester

Core is “leadership in education” with content built around 4 strands:  Ethics and social justice; leadership studies; systems analysis; and inquiry.  No specializations per se.

Capstone

A dissertation; original research study is required.

How do students use their dissertation work in practice following graduation?: 

 

K-16 teachers/instructors and administrators directly draw from and apply work related to problems of practice to their settings. Students continue to build on inquiry skills/theoretical knowledge to new problems of practice. Those going into high education as faculty begin to build a research agenda for dissertation topic.

 

Does your dissertation process take into account impact or potential impact on the field? If so, can you measure the impact?: 

 

All students are encouraged to engage in field-based problem of practice for their dissertation. Much of this effort is organized with an action research format, with students applying and studying solutions to problems.

Program Milestones: 

Student milestones:

  • 1st summer institute
  • Exploration of problems of practice
  • Review of literature for problem of practice
  • 2nd summer institute
  • Draft of dissertation proposal
  • Preliminary (comprehensive) written exam structured around 4 strands of program or students dissertation topic
  • “D-1” defense of dissertation proposal
  • End of program:  Capstone is dissertation based in original research; action research strongly advised
Graduate Competencies:

K-16 teachers, instructors and administrators seek to improve education for social justice, engage in inquiry with an emphasis on improvement, are willing to collaborate (and willing to learn), understand educational systems, and work to engage communities for school reform. Many also have a focus on scholarship within their practice and continue to build on educational theory and skills from their programs.

 

Admission Requirements: 

EdD admission requirements are:

  • 3 letters of reference
  • Statement of professional objectives
  • Resume
  • Copies of K-12 certifications
  • Transcripts of previous university work
  • GRE or Miller Analogy Test scores for applicants in higher education and educational leadership.
  • Scholarly writing sample for applicants in teacher leadership.

Faculty admissions committee (reps from all 4 campuses) considers all evidence and makes recommendation to full faculty

 
General Information:
 
  • Program Delivery: Hybrid
  • Average number of students admitted into the EdD program each year: Approximately 30.
  • Types of employment students hold upon entering the program: K16 teacher/administrator; post secondary instructor/administrator.
  • Typical bachelors degrees held by students upon entering the program: Range.
  • Typical masters degrees held by students upon entering the program:EdM
  • Number of credits in the program (beyond the Masters): 72 with 42 graded credits.
  • Professional qualifications required of prospective students: Desire for school improvement, open-mindedness, willingness to collaborate, willingness to see educational systems as multi-level systems, dedication to social justice, willingness to engage communities for school improvement.
  • Length of Program: 4-5 years
  • Are most students part time or full time?: part time
  • Admissions Cycle: Applications due by mid January.Applicant notification of admissions status by early April.Classes begin second week of July.
  • Average number of students enrolled in each cohort: Approximately 15.
  • Total number of faculty: 30
  • Current PK-20 Practitioner: Approximately 20%
  • Former PK-20 Practitioner, Current University Faculty: Approximately 80%
  • Current University Faculty: Approximately 80%
  • University faculty from discipline outside of education: Nursing, business, technology.
  • Current PK-20 Practitioner: Approximately 5%.
  • Former PK-20 Practitioner, Current University Faculty: Approximately 40%.
  • Current University Faculty: Approximately 70%
  • University faculty from Discipline outside Education: Approximately 20% for interdisciplinary dissertations.
Research Courses:
  • Introduction to research.
  • Action research.
  • Qualitative reserach.
  • Quantitative research.
  • Dissertation and methodology study.

Students are encouraged to learn how to frame research questions to grounded problems and select research methods appropriate to those questions. Student are also expected to learn to collaborate and work together in pursuit of framing problems theoretically, inquiring as distributed teams, and applying solutions to specific settings. Furthermore, students are expected to examine their work not in a piecemeal fashion, but as part of a larger research strategy.

Content Courses:

Students are encourage to take electives in their area of interest (e.g., place-based education).

Unique Pedagogies:

Students are prepared to engage in cricical auto-ethnographies and duoethnographies as parts of coursework as a means to examine personal positionality.

Design Process:

We are currently undergoing a program redesign. The following is the description and method for the curriculum mapping portion of the restructuring.

Phase One. This will be a relatively short meeting (2-3 hours). Here the four of us (and any volunteers) introduce and frame the subsequent meeting(s) (which might be a retreat). In phase one we cover a number of topics:

1. Program standards/frames (PESB certification for teachers and principals, student learning outcomes for the
program, CPED principles, COE conceptual framework).
2. Briefly, underlying program theory (organizational theory, CRT, PBE, CoP).
3. The assessment system currently in place established to support student growth. Keeping track of evidence
(this topic is introduced and followed up in phase three).
4. General overview and scope and sequence of program courses. Specialization definition and synergy.
5. Program governance and instructor selection criterion.
6. Clarifying questions about follow-up meeting.

The idea is to present program information but more importantly to generate discussion around these topics. The goal is to have participants share stories of their existing practice in relation to our presentation.

Phase Two. This will be the planning session. We left undecided the specific location (in person or over AMS) and whether to have a half/full day retreat or two shorter sessions. (I am thinking now that may a full day AMS session might be the way to go.) In any case, we decided that we could organize the course planning sessions to have lead faculty work together in the three program areas (leadership, foundations, and research core). Also, we would begin this session by modeling planning for at least two of the summer institute courses.

Phase Three: In this phase we would begin to examine and develop policy around some of the topics we would have introduced earlier. This would include assessment, governance, and credit for doctoral student.

OUTLINE OF CURRICULUM MAPPING RETREAT

1. Program standards/frames (PESB certification for teachers and principals, student learning outcomes for the
program, CPED principles, COE conceptual framework). Gordon (PSEB), Rick (CPED), Sharon (COE).

2. Briefly, underlying program theory—both what we currently do and what we WANT to do (organizational theory,
CRT, PBE, communities of practice).

3. The assessment system currently in place established to support student growth. Keeping track of evidence
(this topic is introduced and followed up in phase three).

4. General overview and scope and sequence of program courses. Specialization definition and synergy.

5. Program governance and instructor selection criterion.

6. Clarifying questions about follow-up meeting. 

Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED)
Headquartered @ The University of Pittsburgh School of Education
4318 Posvar Hall - 230 S. Bouquet Street - Pittsburgh, PA 15260
info@cpedinitiative.org   +1 (412) 648-7428